16 May 2010

hidden away


this elusive native woodland plant grows in dampish shady spots in the woods. the flower of this plant is called jack-in-the-pulpit. that hooded part is the flower - fascinating, albeit not very showy, i'm afraid. but take a peek below and you will see the solitary "jack" standing upright in the "pulpit" under the hood. see?

odd that i found more than a dozen of these, scattered in the woods at the edge of the yard. i have seen these plants only a few times in my life and have no idea why there are suddenly so many. i do hope they haven't been here all along and i just never noticed!

15 comments:

The Insomniac said...

I love flowers and plants! I have to say, I have never seen one of these! What a cool looking plant! Thanks for posting! I'm happy I came across your blog. I really enjoy it!

Blissed-Out Grandma said...

Interesting that there are so many this year. I wonder whether they will multiply in future years.

Saradia's blogs said...

Hey Chris, this is insectivorous or what?? actually it looks like pitcher plants which feed on flies sitting over it!

Lynne said...

Thanks for sharing those images - I have never heard of or seen these flowers.

Rai said...

Same here. It's really cool. Though I'm not that really of a nature-walker. It's really nice to see some plants or flowers that are rarely seen. Have a good day. :)

Naturedigital said...

Great photographs ..
I have seen a few of those.. or similar .. in Crete.
Do you know if they smell bad.. like rotting flesh.. to attract the flies.?
Those I have seen before, they do.
Costas

Danny Laurent said...

the plant's so cool, i've never seen it eaither, woot!

Tabor said...

I have seen a few of the smaller varieties in the tropics. If there are more I hope it is not a sign of air pollution!

BigPerm said...

so amazing! fantastic picture- as per usual!

susan t. landry said...

great, chris...love these. they do have some of the same charm as pitcher plants....

Vlatka said...

Interesting name for such unusual plant. Thanks for sharing.

just me said...

Jacks can grow to be quite large, I have seen some that the Jack inside were as big as your index finger. A rarity is an Albino plant. the outer part is a very pale green and the Jack as white, to a pea green. They can be transplanted, but like shady rich soil.

Suz said...

Oh I love your Jacks!
Woodlands for sure...enjoy and protect them... their berries turn bright red..the birds love them....they grow bigger ever year...mine are gigantic...
No they are not insect eating

K9friend said...

It certainly has an interesting look...and interesting names, too!

Pat
www.critteralley.blogspot.com

pat said...

These are great and yes, i think that this is indeed a "Banner Year for Jack". I have more this year than ever and, many in different locations in my yard.....a few years ago i thought that they had completely disappeared and am so thrilled that they returned in all their glory. I even saw a lady slipper the other day, first one in years. Let's hope that these are previews of wonderful things to come!