06 April 2011

snow by any other name

somewhere i read that indigenous people in far northern climates have many different words for snow,  depending on what the flakes look like, how and when the snow falls, whether it's wet or dry. i was disappointed to learn this information is untrue, just an urban legend. but snow like this afternoon's deserves a name other than ordinary snow. the enormous fat flakes float sooo slooowly and silently, melting on contact and amounting to nothing more than a sudden sharp gasp as you step out into the wonder of it. it was breathtaking - just like standing inside a child's snow globe.

6 comments:

Lynne said...

Wow! Beautiful for someone (like me) for whom snow is a "plan to travel to see some" kind of thing. But I gather many Americans are kind of sick of winter.

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Tabor said...

Looks like 'pillow-fight' snow to me.

Nora said...

I'm glad you helped put that urban legend to rest. They say 'wet snow' and 'dry snow' just like we do. I thought your snow was all finished by now. I'm sorry to hear that you got some more. Is this normal?

CrazyCris said...

Damn... you sure about that? Perhaps it's in different languages. In English there might not be so many terms for snow, but how about in Norwegian or Swedish or Inuit? I know in the Antarctic there are many different terms for the ice!

I miss snow... but I wouldn't want it to go on "forever" I like I see in some parts of the world!

chris said...

Nora: this is new england, where anything can happen weather-wise. no, this is not abnormal. i think we were just spoiled by last year's combination of little snowfall and warm temperatures. this time last year, i had crocus in bloom!